Author Topic: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe  (Read 14282 times)

origamikaren

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #45 on: December 28, 2005, 12:31:36 AM »
Quote
By the way, did anyone else notice that Douglas Gresham, the stepson that CS Lewis adopted, was one of the co-producers of the film?  I found this interesting.  I'm sure most people wouldn't notice that, but I about jumped out of my seat when his name came on screen.  I thought that made for an interesting touch.

Yes! I noticed that too and pointed it out to Karen! She didn't realize who he was until I said so.

(In Shadowlands Joy Gresham's two kids were merged into one and youthened quite a bit for who knows what reason.)

[EDIT: Ah, sorry, this is Ookla on Karen's computer.]
« Last Edit: December 28, 2005, 12:32:04 AM by origamikaren »
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Baba_Yaga

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #46 on: December 28, 2005, 11:48:29 AM »
I thought that was interesting too.  Shadowlands is a favorite movie of mine, and for a long time I thought she only had one child.  I read a quote from Douglas Gresham describing the first meeting that he had with Lewis and I think Shadowlands still caught some of the feel of that first meeting.  He spoke of his anticipation of meeting this magical man who held the keys to Narnia.  I think it was a bit of a shock for him to get there and find a quiet professor.

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #47 on: December 28, 2005, 11:52:07 AM »
Please don't post spoilers for upcoming sequels, if you want to start a Narnia spoilers in the book section the please feel free to do so.  But this thread isn't the place for that.
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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #48 on: December 28, 2005, 01:14:08 PM »
Shadowlands is a bio of CS Lewis' life; it's not a Narnia book

Interestingly, the BBC production of Shadowlands was written by the same man and does *not* conflate the two sons. Nor do either of them show up hardly at all.

Peter Ahlstrom

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #49 on: December 28, 2005, 05:51:57 PM »
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Shadowlands is a bio of CS Lewis' life; it's not a Narnia book

Yeah, I was confused by his comment too, but you did hint at spoilers about Susan's fate in the final book of the series.
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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #50 on: December 29, 2005, 09:00:55 AM »
ah, but I didn't say what her fate *is*. Only those who've already had it spoiled or who have read it will understand what I mean.

I actually wonder how that last book would pan out on the screen. It doesn't seem like it'd be good for the masses.

fuzzyoctopus

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #51 on: December 29, 2005, 02:56:53 PM »
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I actually wonder how that last book would pan out on the screen. It doesn't seem like it'd be good for the masses.


Oh, I'm sure the whole thing with Tash and the neighboring country of evil "Arab" types would go over well....
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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #52 on: January 13, 2006, 03:26:47 PM »
I finally saw it last night. I loved it. Lucy was amazing--I agree with e on her expressiveness. I thought it was well-done, and even if the acting (and I noticed the waterfall scene problem, too--what were they thinking?) by the kids was sometimes a little off, it wasn't enough that I felt it--and though I avoided this thread till I saw it, someone had told me that they thought the older kids were a little wooden, yet I didn't see it any worse than the writing in the book, which wasn't exactly the best-written children's book I've ever read. And as we all know, I've read many.

I didn't like the White Witch, however. I actually expected her to have the coloring that Edmund had--pale, pale skin and jet-black hair. I didn't like her makeup, and her acting didn't help. She felt very transparent from the beginning, and it seems so obvious that even Edmund should notice she's not quite right. Yet the feeling I got from the book is that at least at first, Edmund didn't think she was mean. But it's been a few years since I've reread the books.
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lehea

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #53 on: January 02, 2007, 12:45:10 AM »
This movie was MAGNIFICENT!  8)
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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #54 on: January 02, 2007, 07:56:11 PM »
I actually didn't like the movie very much at all. It was long and boring, and far more concerned with how things looked than what they were or what they meant--which can be good with a highly stylistic director, but this was all very straightforward. There was never a moment where I thought "wow, I've never seen that before," which there probably should be in a fantasy movie that has nothing but visuals going for it.
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Spriggan

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #55 on: January 02, 2007, 08:01:19 PM »
It had Turkish Delight which I don't think I've ever seen in a film before.
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Aen Elderberry

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #56 on: January 02, 2007, 08:31:04 PM »
(Since I didn't comment the first time this thread was alive . . . )

Even as a child I thought that having Santa Claus in Narnia was weird.  Some of the other Narnia books include Greek mythology and other "outside" elements.  That confused me when I was young.  "Who is this Bacchus guy and why is he getting drunk?"  Now it just annoys me.   I understand that Tolkien was upset with Lewis's sloppy world building.  He disliked the Narnia books in large part because Lewis included things like Father Christmas.  He hated the inconsistency and the mixing of mythologies.  But Tolkien went to the other extreme with his world building.  His books are excellent in part because of his extensive world building.  But would it have been cool if he'd spent a little less time on his extensive histories and grammars and instead written another book.  He did start one that had the Lord of the Nazgul surviving the fall of Sauron and returning as the new Dark Lord.  But he only made it about a chapter.

Regardless of this "flaw" in Lewis's Narnia books I still love them and have read them many times (I've even read 5 of them in Spanish).

Anyway, I enjoyed LWW: the movie, but it didn't get the deep emotional feeling that I get from the book.
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dreamking47

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #57 on: January 02, 2007, 09:16:41 PM »
But Tolkien went to the other extreme with his world building.  His books are excellent in part because of his extensive world building.  But would it have been cool if he'd spent a little less time on his extensive histories and grammars and instead written another book.  He did start one that had the Lord of the Nazgul surviving the fall of Sauron and returning as the new Dark Lord.  But he only made it about a chapter.

Do you remember where you read/heard this?  I know in the Letters book he mentions he dabbled with a story set after LotR where kids played at being in Orc cults and such, but he stopped because he basically didn't think there was anything more to tell in that world.

There is the Children of Hurin book coming out this year.

With regards to Narnia (getting back on track) I always liked the admittedly odd inclusion of Father Christmas and the like.  Especially reading the book when I was younger, I remember really thinking that the sleigh chasing the children must be the witch, and to have it then be Father Christmas...it was precisely the sort of "wow" moment that can make fantasy, where anything can happen, special.

I can understand Tolkien's criticism, but it also strikes me as ironic given that it was the cross-pollination of his Middle Earth mythologies (themselves based on several mythological sources) into the children's fantasy of The Hobbit that led to The Lord of the Rings.

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Aen Elderberry

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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #58 on: January 02, 2007, 10:08:54 PM »
Do you remember where you read/heard this?  I know in the Letters book he mentions he dabbled with a story set after LotR where kids played at being in Orc cults and such, but he stopped because he basically didn't think there was anything more to tell in that world.

In volume 12 of the History of Middle Earth
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Peoples_of_Middle-earth
"The New Shadow - An incomplete sequel (approximately 30 pages) to The Lord of the Rings that Tolkien quickly abandoned, set in the time of Eldarion, Aragorn's son."

One of the few History of Middle Earth books I've read.
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Re: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
« Reply #59 on: January 02, 2007, 10:19:34 PM »
I can't wait for the day that EUOL dies so his kids can make their livings off of "completing" his unfinished and unpublsihed works for their living.  If you live long enough you might see Dragonsteel or Whitesand in the bookstore as completed by EUOL's kids.
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